When architects plan building designs, how is time reflected in their blueprints?

Calendars

To help keep us focused on your selected project for the semester, the readings for this course will be kept to a minimum. The calendar below outlines the concepts we’ll discuss and the main readings we’ll draw from. We won’t read much, but in exchange you’ll need to read the content intently. In addition, each time we discuss a text in class, you’ll also read any one text referenced from within the assigned text. For instance, when we read Doug Eyman’s thoughts on digital rhetoric, you might choose to also read Angela Haas’s ideas, which Eyman cites on page 19 of his text.

Overall, our goal this semester will be to go slowly and deliberately, which is reflected in the calendar below. Our pace should help you build a deep and complex understanding of how writing works in digital spaces. Below are simplified calendars of weekly reading assignments and broad project goals by unit. A complete course calendar including all readings and detailed weekly project goals is also available externally.

Readings Calendar

TopicWeekAuthor & Text/Section Title
Privacy and Agency on the Web1Understanding and Maintaining Your Privacy When Writing with Digital Technologies” from Lindsey C. Kim (2022) and “Messy and Chaotic Learning” (text or audio) from Martha Fay Burtis (2015)
Positioning Terminology2“Digital” § (pp. 18–20) in “Defining and Locating Digital Rhetoric” from Doug Eyman (2015)
3“Digital Literacy” § in “Defining and Locating Digital Rhetoric” from Doug Eyman (2015)
4“Digital Rhetoric” § (pp. 24–31) in “Defining and Locating Digital Rhetoric” from Doug Eyman (2015)
Traditional Writing5“Speaking, Writing, and Literacy” § in “Old Media, New Media, and Knowledge” from J. D. Applen (2013)
6“Text” § in “Defining and Locating Digital Rhetoric” from Doug Eyman (2015)
7“The age of print and the late age of print” through “Words on pages and screens” (pp. 12–22) in “Old Media, New Media, and Knowledge” from J. D. Applen (2013)
New Media8“New Media and Literacy” § in “Old Media, New Media, and Knowledge” from J. D. Applen (2013)
9“New Media” § in “Defining and Locating Digital Rhetoric” from Doug Eyman (2015)
10Brock’s “Toward the Rhetorical Study of Code”, stopping at Critical Code Studies on p. 21
Platforms11“McLuhan and Media’s Messages” § in “Old Media, New Media, and Knowledge” from J. D. Applen (2013)
12“Human-Computer Interaction (HCI)” to the end in “Defining and Locating Digital Rhetoric” from Doug Eyman (2015)
13“Visual Rhetoric” § in “Defining and Locating Digital Rhetoric” from Doug Eyman (2015)
14“Intertextuality” § in “Defining and Locating Digital Rhetoric” from Doug Eyman (2015)

Project Calendar

Because website creation and design is a creative, iterative, experimental process, our weekly goals need to be flexible. Early in the semester, you’ll create specific weekly goals for your project, and we’ll revisit those goals as the course progresses. Broadly stated, we’ll do the following in class:

TopicProject Goals & Assignments
Privacy and Agency on the WebEstablish a domain + hosting + practice blog post
Positioning TerminologyInstall WordPress; select theme; build placeholder pages; 3 weekly blog posts
Traditional WritingComplete layout mockups on all placeholder pages; 3 weekly blog posts
New MediaComplete text and advanced layouts on all pages; 3 weekly blog posts
PlatformsAesthetics complete; connections to discourse community established; publicity plan; 4 weekly blog posts
ExamsCourse Audit + textbook chapter